Philadelphia Eagles prints

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I am so proud of my Philadelphia Eagles for winning the Super Bowl! I made this painting to commemorate the big parade and rally in Philadelphia on February 8, 2018, and am selling prints. I will donate a portion of sales to the Eagles Charitable Foundation.

PRINTS

8×10″ print – $29.50
($25.00 for the print + $1.50 MD sales tax + $3.00 shipping) 

11×14″ print – $50.70
($45.00 for the print + $2.70 MD sales tax + $3.00 shipping)

16×20″ print – $83.50
($75.00 for the print + $4.50 MD sales tax + $4.00 shipping)

To order: Send payment via Paypal (direct link to my page) or Venmo (to @elissapoma). Please include the mailing address where you’d like the print sent. If you do not use online payment apps, please email me for my address, to send a check or money order.

When to expect your print: Prints will be mailed starting Tuesday, February 14. Please expect to receive your print within a few days of your order. Prints are sent via Priority Mail; if you wish to pay an upcharge for Fedex, please email me.

About the print: Giclée prints come as shown above, minus the watermark (the large signature, which is just on the online version). Giclée is a special technology that makes individual reproductions of fine art using a high-quality inkjet printer on watercolor paper. The print is fade proof and lightfast.

OTHER ITEMS

By popular demand, the print can also be ordered on canvas, wood or acrylic. Also available are gift items like pillows, iPhone cases, greeting cards, notebooks, towels, blankets and totebags at my Pixels.com shop. Thank you for the suggestion–a great one, and I especially think the shower curtain is pretty awesome.

 

Questions:
Email me at elissapoma@gmail.com or call/text 202-309-5000 (mobile).

Thank you for supporting my artwork, for supporting the Eagles’ charity and for supporting our Philadelphia Eagles!

 

The World is Their Home, Literally

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Elia Locardi met his wife Naomi when they were teens in the Florida Keys. Today the Locardis have no home. They’re perpetual nomads, traipsing around the globe taking photos and videos, writing about their experiences and leading tours.

This March will mark the fifth consecutive year the 30-something couple has been on the road. They’re the subject of a new travel documentary by SmugMug Films, the video wing of the photo storage and sharing site SmugMug. The videos tell the behind-the-lens stories of some of its most interesting photographer users, and the Locardis certainly fit that bill.

See the documentary and read my Q&A with the Locardis on Independent Traveler.

Where to Travel in 2017

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A January tradition among travel experts and publications is to present their lists of the best destinations for the new year.

We love knowing what’s hot and what’s not, but there’s often no rhyme or reason to the selections in many of these lists. And some are so long that they don’t help you decide where to go. AFAR Magazine, for example, picked an overwhelming 100 places.

To help you decide which lists are the most useful, we read every “best of 2017” travel article we could find and selected the following as the best among them.

Lonely Planet – Best in Travel 2017: Canada tops the travel guide’s Top 10 Countries list, thanks to a favorable exchange rate for Americans and planned celebrations for the nation’s 150th anniversary (including free admission to all national parks). Its “best of” site also includes a list of the best value destinations (Nepal comes out on top) and best U.S. destinations (Asheville, North Carolina).

Forbes – 10 Coolest Places to Go in 2017: Forbes’ offering stands out because it’s different than every other “best of” list out there. Destinations were selected for their coolness quotient and include spots you may never have heard of before. For instance, there’s a spot within the Hoh Rainforest in Olympic National Park in Washington state that’s considered the quietest place in all of North America.

Travel + Leisure – 50 Best Places to Travel in 2017: Fifty places is a lot, but we like the research that went into the list from the monthly travel magazine. Editors spend several months surveying writers and travel specialists around the world. The alphabetical list includes Cape Town, South Africa, which debuts a new museum of contemporary African art this year; Helsinki, Finland, which is celebrating 100 years of independence in December; and Jackson Hole, Wyoming, as the spot to view a total solar eclipse in August.

National Geographic Travel – Best Trips: While it’s not evident why certain spots were selected, we nonetheless like this feature because the page is so beautifully designed and interactive. Places are bundled into categories such as nature, cities and culture.

New York Times – 52 Places to Go in 2017: We always savor this annual list, which is long enough (and includes enough multimedia extras) to linger over throughout the month.

Reprinted from Independent Traveler.

My 5 Best Airport Hacks

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Thanks to my perfectionist ways, I tend to do pretty well in airports. I arrive early, wear slip-on shoes that are easy to get on and off at security, organize my carry-on items well and constantly check the departure board for changes related to my flight.

But in the same way some travelers are always on the prowl for discounted getaways, my travel obsession of late is studying new strategies to master the airport experience. Fortunately, there are others out there like me, and they’ve shared their tips to hack your way through the airport.

Here are five tips and recommendations that I’ve found particularly useful lately:

Take screengrabs of your mobile boarding pass: This great article on the New Zealand website Stuffreminded me how finicky some apps can be — and that Murphy’s law dictates they’ll give you the most problems when you’re just about to approach the security officer in line at the airport. Avoid such problems by taking a screengrab of your boarding pass and displaying that. Chances are, it’s much easier to open your phone’s photos folder than to count on an airline’s app to work exactly when you need it to.

Pack an outlet splitter in your carry-on: There’s nothing more frustrating than needing desperately to charge your phone at the airport but finding all the outlets are occupied. Insider smartly suggests packing an outlet splitter, which turns one outlet into two. Then you just ask another tethered device addict to share the outlet and you both get to charge up. Outlet splitters cost just a few dollars and are widely available.

Download airport apps: I have plenty of airline apps on my phone, along with GateGuru, but I never thought to download apps for the airports themselves. Airplane News’ 10 Common Mistakes You’re Making at the Airport reminded me to download the airport apps too. I found this especially useful on a recent trip to seek out a decent place to eat and find an alternate restroom when the one near my gate was closed for cleaning.

Tune in to your brainwaves: In the recent Inc. article 10 Tips From Travel Experts, Flight Attendants and Other Frequent Fliers, an executive in South Carolina recommends a noise reduction and stress relief app called Brain Wave, and I’m absolutely hooked. Not only is it great for chilling out on the plane, but I also find it helps me deal with the anxious masses at the gate.

Pick airport security lines to the left: I should have known this because I’m left-handed, but somehow it slipped my mind: Because most people are right-handed, they tend to gravitate to the right-side security lines. So it’s likely the lines to the left will be shorter, according to our own 18 Best Airport Hacks. This tip has been around for a while, but it’s still holding fast and true.

Reprinted from Independent Traveler

Q&A: Why You Must Go on Vacation

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It’s summer. The majority of European workers are likely on vacation while American workers are toiling away at the office, warehouse or other workplace. This isn’t necessarily because Europeans get more time off on average than their American counterparts (although they do). Poll after poll shows that around half of all Americans don’t use all of their allotted vacation time.

Kanisa Baker has had enough. Americans must take vacation time, she says, for their sanity, for their health and for a fulfilling life. The 40-year-old from Maryland started Travel More Work Less, a website and online community that encourages people to use their vacation time. She knows firsthand how hard this is — but also why it’s so important.

IndependentTraveler.com: Why did you decide to make this your mission?
Kanisa Baker:
I used to be self-employed and could take off as much time as I wanted. But when I took a job with another company, I found that I was barely using my vacation time to take any significant trips. After talking to friends and coworkers and doing research on American workers, I saw how many of us are not taking much-needed and deserved time off.

Some studies show that we are more likely to suffer from heart disease [if we don’t take] vacation — women especially. I started Travel More Work Less so that together we could identify real strategies to break from the routine and stresses of life and put more vacation days on the calendar.

IT: Why do you think Americans don’t use all of their vacation time?
KB:
Because of a lack of planning. Many of us have an “autopilot” lifestyle, and planning a vacation can be a lot of work. You have to identify the location and the best time to go, search for the best price, figure out which activities are available, determine the best place to stay, etc. So many times we throw up our hands and either stick with our regular daily routine or just have a “staycation.”

There is choice and intention behind taking a vacation. If you don’t plan for a “real” vacation, you end up using your days off to stay home or visit family. Those options can be even more stressful than a day at work.

IT: Some people don’t use vacation time because they can’t afford to go away. What would you advise them to do?
KB:
This is one of the top reasons holding people, myself included, back. The costs associated with life, work and stress get in the way. Travel then gets pushed to the bottom of the priority list. One useful piece of advice is to focus on small, daily and intentional [money-saving] habits like eating out less, letting go of the unused gym membership, or selling stuff that you don’t need, all to increase travel funds. Save that money instead in a vacation fund.

IT: What advice do you have for people who are worried about work piling up if they took time off?
KB:
I wrote a guide about this exact topic, and one of the strategies I discuss is implementing a cross-training program within your company/organization. This could reduce the amount of work to come back to after a vacation.

IT: Is it okay for people to check email or do work while they’re away?
KB:
Well, checking email on the beach is certainly better than checking it in the office. But being on vacation means it’s important to be in the present moment with your loved ones. Perhaps it’s best to vacation is spots where Wi-Fi is very limited!

IT: Do you think people would take more time off if employers gave their employees more vacation time?
KB:
That’s a tough one. It really comes down to the person. Either you are someone that values and sees the importance of vacation time or you aren’t.

IT: Where do you like to travel on vacation?
KB:
As I’ve gotten older, I found I get really antsy on long plane rides. So I’ve enjoyed exploring vacation spots closer to home like Canada, Central America and the Caribbean. My last vacation was to the Florida Keys and Mexico.

Rediscover Wonder in America’s National Parks

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Your parents were onto something when they forced you to go on summer car trips to visit national parks, or when they shuffled you out the front door to play outside in the fresh air.

You may have groaned at the time—and new generations of children may be rolling their eyes at the same thing—but science has proven parents right: Several studies published over the past year, including one in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, confirm the mental health benefits of spending time in nature.

We’ve all heard about the physical benefits of a walk or a hike, but even a short stroll in nature can decrease negative thinking, combat stress, and alleviate fatigue, a Stanford University study suggests. And other research has found that exposure to sunlight can boost vitamin D levels and elevate your mood.

Any green space will do, but we say go for the gusto and spend time in a national park. The National Park Service is celebrating its 100th anniversary throughout 2016, so get out and reap the benefits of seeing our nation’s parks for yourself.

From World Wildlife magazine, summer 2016

Photo © National Park Service